Welcome to BlogDogIt Friday, August 17 2018 @ 05:47 AM EDT

I Am Travis Just Uploaded A Video

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masodo's musings

#BreakfastClub

I Am TravisThis is a Class Project for VP172 at Southern Oregon University. Directed by Travis Wheat.

I happened upon the Travster1000 YouTube Channel several years ago and even featured his video titled "Nahalem Bay Adventure" here on BlogDogIt (it has since been set to private.[smiley::(]) Although it was basically a "home movie," it exhibited all indications of having been created by a budding cinematographer and was edited to a tee. "This kid," I thought, "is on the right track."

Thanks to ability to subscribe to channels on YouTube I received the notification today that  I Am Travis was back at it...

The video featured here is a fun bit of "hamming" that ultimately proves to provide the viewer a reasonable comedic "lift" and no shortage of entertainment value. Just remember this is a class project and enjoy it for all it's worth...

The Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGDh8vk4iwo

The Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Travster1000/

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Free Flat Plane Plan

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masodo's musings

Flat PlanePretty much anything you want to know, you need only jump on your favorite search engine enter some keywords and before you know it you just modified your IQ by some fraction of a point. If the internet was kind then that should be a net intelligence gain; you know however, that you always run the risk of shaving off a point (or maybe two) in the exercise.

Sometimes the subject you are seeking to explore is so obscure you don't turn up anything remotely helpful. That is what I was facing this morning when I finally got around to doing something I have been meaning to do for quite awhile...

Build an airplane from 1/8 inch thick Fome-Cor board.

Flat PlaneI have a hard time imagining that I am the only one who has pondered making a glider out of Foam-Core; not intricately carving a model plane out of Styrofoam but creating a bigger version of those little balsa gliders that all the really cool kids fling around the neighbourhood. I have worked around Foam-Core for a great many years (in photography and graphic arts) and I finally waited as long as I could; I just had to know. Since the internet was pretty useless for this project, I decided I would just wing it.

The results are pictured here. Channelling my inner Wilbur/Orville I carefully 'engineered' the following lines. I was kind-of going after a Spitfire feel and think it's not too far off the mark. After first drawing the fuselage (which came in at 27 inches overall) I came up with the wings which offered a 30 inch span - swept back 1 inch in the leading edge; swept forward 2 inches in the trailing edge; measuring 8 inches at the center-line.   The tail-wing/elevator spans 12 inches and is reverse swept compared to the wing at 1" leading edge, 1/2" trailing edge sweep through a 4-1/2" center-line.The yardstick is included in the picture so we might rightly call this a scale template

Flat Plane

Wing mounting slots were positioned somewhat more carefully than random by intersecting the fuselage in the horizontal at the center of the nose and perpendicular to the vertical of the tail. Fuselage center-line is 6 inches behind the wing's leading edge. All cutting was done freehand with an X-acto Knife. I intentionally designed this to be cut using all straight lines to ease the job of reproduction should I ever duplicate this prototype. A jumbo paper clamp was just about right for a nose weight leaving the finished glider just a tad tail-heavy. "Close enough for government work."

The time had come to launch the maiden voyage. Recruiting my back deck and yard into service as an impromptu Kitty Hawk I was fortunate to be facing only a slight head-on breeze and deemed conditions perfect to gently push this bird from the nest. A 20 foot, gentle, sloping fall from a 10 foot height resulted in a safe landing in the grass (as shown in the picture.)

Flat PlaneNot a bad first attempt at realizing a long held daydream. Tinkering with bending the wings into a dihedral, adjustments to elevator, inserting wings in reverse orientation all resulted in no improvement to the original design and ultimately led to a catastrophic stall that resulted in a nose-dive and subsequent crushing impact. Foam-Core is nowhere near as resilient as balsa wood and that is probably why you don't often hear of these sorts of experiments.

So, bottom line? As an art form flat Foam-Core airplanes might have potential but as a toy... not so much. I think any further attempts to build a model aeroplane out of Foam-Core will have to utilize a more complex foray into three dimensions in a quest for durability. Before you invest much time in this pursuit, might I recommend the boundless entertainment and joy available in the building and flying of kites.


Flat PlaneUpdate:

Using the original fuselage as a template I tried cutting a new wide-body version from 1/2" thick foam-core. Attaching the same wings, elevator and nose weight give a far better flying, more durable craft. So if you are looking for something to wow the kids (or the kid in you) this just might be a step in the right direction!


 

 

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The Truth Comes Home

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masodo's musings
World Premier - Ezekiel's Landing - At The Irving

Indie in IndyWhile the rest of geekdom was shedding a happy tear over the announcement of a new installment in the the Star Wars franchise - Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens - this nerd was beside himself over the fact that the world premiere of the long awaited, much ballyhooed, indie sci-fi, horror, action, thriller Ezekiel's Landing was about to occur and in my own back yard (so to speak.) Now don't get me wrong I am a big fan of Star Wars and take pride that I was among the first in line for the premiere screening of Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope in Indianapolis at the luxurious Eastwood Theater in 1977.

Writer/Director James Treakle

 

Irving Theater - not as plush as the infamous Eastwood but with a far more colorful history - was the "happening" place-to-be in Indianapolis for die hard fans of independent films of the sci-fi persuasion. On April 24 the world premier of Eziekiel's Landing was featured "At The Irving."

On first inspection one might find the Irving better suited to a random Rave than a world premier, motion picture unveiling but what it lacked in bolted-to-the-floor seating, carpeting and ceiling tiles it more than made up for in warm, friendly fans of creativity rubbing elbows with the craftspeople who came together to make the night even possible and ultimately enjoyable.

Stage LeftExecutive Producer Kate Chaplin took to the microphone as a pleasantly enthusiastic Master of Ceremony sharing the spotlight with Writer/Director James Treakle who set the stage for a respectable crowd of eager theater goers. The 85 minute film, included the briefest of intermissions 3/4 of the way through by some very needy anti-virus software on the projectors source MacBook - that's free anti-virus for you.[smiley:;)]

Stage RightFollowing the featured presentation was a very informative Q&A session that had all cast and crew in attendance standing in the front of the hall. After taking several questions a suggestion was made that perhaps the wireless microphone should be passed down the line so that each member in attendance might declare their favorite scene and share one of their fondest memories of the production. This was priceless entertainment that can never be equaled. I am thankful to social media for keeping me in the loop so that I could attend this once in a lifetime event.

I encourage you, dear reader, to support the independent filmmaker in whatever genre suits your taste and discover right there, in your own "back yard," what it is that makes the movie industry so magical: the blood, sweat and tears of those individuals with the vision and drive to love, create and share in pursuit of what can only be called a really good movie.

In an effort to show my support for these folks I offer the following review of the film Ezekiel's Landing - originally posted to IMDB:

[ Continue Reading ]

 

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A Movie Like This...

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masodo's musings

A Wedding Like ThatA Wedding Like That

A Wedding Like That

(I originally wrote this review for submission to IMDB -
of course I am happiest to share it here...)

There is little secret regarding the subject of this film. I mean, when the title screen displays dual female symbols beneath the words "A Wedding Like That" you know going in that you are about to be a guest at a same-sex wedding.

I am learning my lesson about overly investigating a film before watching it; I am convinced that many reviewers and synopsis writers seek only to spoil a film in an effort to prove they actually saw it. I truly came to this viewing with no preconceived notions. So let me just tell you I did indeed watch it and I can honestly say my outlook on life is the better for it.

What I fully expected to be a glorification of the homosexual lifestyle turned out to be a heartwarming tale of family love and fatherly obliviousness. As a father myself I was easily drawn to the situational drama and found myself relating on many levels to the fathers of both brides in ways that felt a bit too awkward for comfort. I could however, take comfort in the underlying themes of love and support among caring family and close friends.

What I did not expect was the comedy... I confess that I found myself laughing quite a bit. And not a nervous sort of laughter but a genuine laughter born of witty writing and crafty timing. The entire script was well written in fact. These folks did in forty-two minutes what Hollywood would feel compelled to keep us for ninety minutes only to deliver half the entertainment.

Mark Dessauer and Cindy Maples are a match made in heaven in their portrayal of Sam and Tami Kessler; loving parents ready to face anything or anybody who stands in the way of their family ideal. Tod Reynolds and Gracie Strange are a force to be reckoned with in the roles of "proper" parents Oliver and Debra Dixon who - as it happens - find themselves as the Father and Mother of the Bride too. Laura Kessler and Joan Dixon (enchantingly portrayed by Megan Hunt and Roni Jonah) are the soon to be wed couple. Could it be happening too soon? or perhaps not soon enough?

What could have very easily gone politically active or morally preachy instead stays out of our faces and ultimately plants a tear in the eye of those with a soft spot for love and hope in the triumph of family togetherness. A brilliant work of art in all aspects of production. With Neil Kellen at the camera you would expect a feast for the eyes and that it is. Directors, Neil Kellen and Lewis D. Chaney should start clearing out a spot on the trophy shelf because this has "award-winning" written all over it.

Would I recommend this film? I would go one step farther and say don't you dare miss it. A great achievement by everyone involved.

A Wedding Like That (2015) Trailer

'Like' Them On Facebook

 

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The Finding Time

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masodo's musings

It’s Time To FindAs anyone who follows BlogDogIt on a regular basis will tell you, I really enjoy exploring the internet looking for the rare, obscure or otherwise under-appreciated. Many of my posts therefore tend to be highlighting interesting finds. Lately however, my expendable online efforts have been focused more around finding time - or more specifically

TheFindingTime.com.

The Finding Time is a new adventure that my wife and I are embarking upon in the form of an online shop that is seeking to offer many rare obscure or otherwise under-appreciated items for sale - primarily to the continental United States but eventually worldwide (once we sort out the whole shipping labyrinth.)

TheFindingTime.com is still under construction but is actually a functional store. You are invited to stop by and have a look around but be sure to check back frequently because many items are yet to be added and many descriptions are yet to be written. In fact the writing of those descriptions will likely be satisfying my creative writing needs for awhile so if my activity here on BlogDogIt diminishes you can be assured that is only because the effort is being directed toward The Finding Time. You can think of the new website as my new Blog where you can actually purchase the subject matter.

As a special introductory offer to followers of BlogDogIt.com the following coupon code will allow you take 10% off your first order from
The Finding Time.

Use Redemption Code: BlogDogItFan at checkout time.


Expires March 1, 2016
Good only in the USA (sorry international friends - I will give one to you as soon as I can)
Offer may only be used one time per customer.

Also - Be sure to keep an eye out for TheFindingTime on Etsy and Ebay too!

Plus - you can "LIKE" us on Facebook: 
www.facebook.com/thefindingtime

 

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That's about the size of it...

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masodo's musings

It's A Small World - In Macro

Sometimes toys are for playing with... This simple little video is the result of my desiring to try out the new video camera I received as a gift from my loving family. Proving that I am now liable to video-record just about anything [smiley::D]

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Ground Control to Space Cadet

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masodo's musings

Today (2014 November 29) NASA's - Astronomy Picture of the Day features a stereo anaglyph of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko created from images taken on November 12th during the much-ballyhooed Rosetta mission. The image and its accompanying verbiage is reproduced below:

ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS NASA3D 67P


Image Credit:
ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS

Explanation:
Get out your red/blue glasses and float next to a comet! The Rosetta mission lander Philae's ROLIS camera snapped the two frames used to create
this stereo anaglyph for 3D viewing during its November 12 descent to the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The comet's curious double lobed nucleus is seen nearly end on from a distance of about 3 kilometers, about 1 hour before Philae arrived at the surface. Philae's initial landing site is near the center of the front facing lobe. Part of a landing gear foot cuts across the upper right corner, in the close foreground of the 3D-view. Philae bounced twice in the comet's weak gravity after its first contact with the surface. Using high resolution camera images from the Rosetta orbiter along with data from the lander's instruments, controllers have followed Philae's impromptu journey over the comet's surface and have identified a likely area for its final resting place.

I did round up my Red/Blue 3D Specs and found this to be a most awesome stereo view. For those who might not have ready access to their own 3D glasses I have created a serviceable stereo pair for freeviewing. (If you are not hip to freeviewing, take a look at this dandy tutorial designed to get you moving in the right dimensions.)

Comet-67P-3D
StereoView built by masodo

 

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I Finally Read: "Found, Near Water"

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masodo's musings

Author: Katherine Hayton I have been following the Twitter Feed of Kathern Hayton for a few months now and thanks to that activity I was recently made aware of a special promotion she had in conjunction with StoryCartel whereby I could download her novel "Found, Near Water" in exchange for agreeing to give an honest review of the work. This post is me upholding my end of that most exceptional bargain.

After having read the synapses and excerpts for this book and actually getting to see and hear Katherine via her Canterbury Live interview, I was thrilled at the chance to finally read "Found, Near Water."

Katherine Hayton hails from Christchurch, New Zealand and - to be honest - my thoughts and opinions of New Zealand have their roots largely in the television sit-com Seven Periods with Mr Gormsby.* As great as that TV series was, one can only assume there is more to learn about this remote Pacific Island nation and titular home of the Kiwi. This story takes place in Christchurch and the prospect of glimpsing the life of the New Zealander was all the encouragement I needed to desire to read the story but by the time this offer to read for free came along I was eager to consume the writing of Katherine Hayton who, I was learning - by virtue of her blogging - has a way with words and an ability to engage the imagination.

*Thanks in no small part to the globe shrinking power of the late, great "TheBox.bz"

Found, Near Water

Found, Near Water

Rena Sutherland wakes from a coma into a mother’s nightmare. Her daughter is missing – lost for four days – but no one has noticed; no one has complained; no one has been searching.

As the victim support officer assigned to her case, Christine Emmett puts aside her own problems as she tries to guide Rena through the maelstrom of her daughter’s disappearance.

A task made harder by an ex-husband desperate for control; a paedophile on early-release in the community; and a psychic who knows more than seems possible.

And intertwined throughout, the stories of six women; six daughters lost.

  

I think it is fair to say that I have never been much of a fan of fiction per se and even less a reader of crime related writing. When I do set down to consume a novel it is more typically in the science fiction genre. More often than not when I read a book it is non-fiction - the dryer the better. I suppose my aversion to fiction has to do with what I find to be the tedium of proper character development and quite often my inability to relate or even care about an authors central characters. I often hear that for many people reading fiction is an escape but I reckon I have always preferred to keep a firm grip on reality.

"Found, Near Water" is a thrilling story of mystery and suspense that reads very much as a memoir and gives the reader the sense that they are privy to what would otherwise be sealed records regarding these six stories of loss.

It is strange how disparate losses can be the bond uniting several women in search of support. When answers are just as absent as their missing loved ones the options for moving forward are few and the urge to give up can be strong. But there is only so much that can be done when you are outside of the "system." A jaded social worker seems an unlikely hero for this support group but having a desk in the vicinity of a Detective Senior Sergeant may be just the break they have been waiting for.

I find it incredible to think that this is Katherine Haytons' first novel as I found it to be a most enjoyable read; a compelling "page turner" that had an unrelenting grip on my interest and had me relating and emoting with these characters as though I too required a seat in that circle of support. I was impressed by the details and imagery and found realism in the New Zealand vernacular and applaud Katherine for not sanitizing this tale of horror and hope.

I recommend this book to anyone with a fondness for compelling storytelling of mystery and suspense. If you have ever found yourself looking to read a great work of fiction by an obscure author on the fast track to success, pick up "Found, Near Water" and you too will be on the lookout for her next one. Bring it on Katherine Hayton... and thanks for sharing!

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18% Gray

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masodo's musings

18% Gray

 

Many moments spent gazing upon the ground glass. Framing the scene.
Creating the view. Waiting for the 'click'.

 

The click belonging not so much to the hardware shutter but rather
to the mind's eye-opener.

 

That splendid moment when all the elements within the box come together in perfect balance (or awesome chaos.)

 

It's a butterfly chase. It's a lightning witness. It's a eureka moment of grand discovery.

 

It's a warm kiss on the cheek.

The photographers spirit.

Michael S. DeBurger

Originally published July 7, 2010 in Rule of Thirds Tutorial - BlogDogIt.com

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