Welcome to BlogDogIt Thursday, July 02 2020 @ 04:52 AM EDT

Oil'd

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BlogDogIt

How much oil was that, exactly?

 :

Designed, animated and written by Chris Harmon

[Quote]

A year ago, a massive oil spill began in the Gulf. The entire country was glued to the news until the well was capped, and then we forgot about it.

As the year anniversary was fast approaching I became curious, just how much oil was that exactly? Where would it have gone? What I found was shocking.

So in an effort to further our discussion on oil dependency I created this short animation. I've spent all of my free time in the last month putting this together to help illustrate just how dependent we truly are on oil.

[/Quote]

Source: http://vimeo.com/harmondesign/oild

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Love and Friendship

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BlogDogIt

The Importance of Communication

Image Source: hlifemedia.com

Oh, the comfort - the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person - having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away.

~Dinah Craik, A Life for a Life, 1859

Quote discovered at:
stubbornella.org

Read The Book Online: A Life For A Life by Dinah Craik

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Mystery Blast In Space

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NASA Telescopes Join Forces To Observe Unprecedented Explosion

closeup of GRB110328A
Images from Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical (white, purple) and X-ray telescopes (yellow and red) were combined in this view of GRB 110328A. The blast was detected only in X-rays, which were collected over a 3.4-hour period on March 28. Credit: NASA/Swift/Stefan Immler
› Expanded image with labels

Hubble image showing location of GRB110328A
This is a visible-light image of GRB 110328A's host galaxy (arrow) taken on April 4 by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3. The galaxy is 3.8 billion light-years away. Credit: NASA/ESA/A. Fruchter (STScI)
› Larger image

Chandra image of grb110328a
NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory completed this four-hour exposure of GRB 110328A on April 4. The center of the X-ray source corresponds to the very center of the host galaxy imaged by Hubble (red cross). Credit: NASA/CXC/ Warwick/A. Levan
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Gamma ray light curve graph recorded by Chandra
GRB 110328A has repeatedly flared in the days following its discovery by Swift. This plot shows the brightness changes recorded by Swift's X-ray Telescope. Credit: NASA/Swift/Penn State/J. Kennea
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WASHINGTON -- NASA's Swift satellite, Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory have teamed up to study one of the most puzzling cosmic blasts ever observed. More than a week later, high-energy radiation continues to brighten and fade from its location.
Astronomers say they have never seen such a bright, variable, high-energy, long-lasting burst before. Usually, gamma-ray bursts mark the destruction of a massive star, and flaring emission from these events never lasts more than a few hours.


Although research is ongoing, astronomers feel the unusual blast likely arose when a star wandered too close to its galaxy's central black hole. Intense tidal forces probably tore the star apart, and the infalling gas continues to stream toward the hole. According to this model, the spinning black hole formed an outflowing jet along its rotational axis. A powerful blast of X- and gamma rays is seen when the jet is pointed in our direction.


On March 28, Swift's Burst Alert Telescope discovered the source in the constellation Draco when it erupted with the first in a series of powerful blasts.

"We know of objects in our own galaxy that can produce repeated bursts, but they are thousands to millions of times less powerful than the bursts we are seeing. This is truly extraordinary," said Andrew Fruchter at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore.
Swift determined a position for the explosion, which now is cataloged as gamma-ray burst (GRB) 110328A, and informed astronomers worldwide.

As dozens of telescopes turned to study the spot, astronomers quickly noticed a small, distant galaxy very near the Swift position. A deep image taken by Hubble on Monday, April 4, pinpointed the source of the explosion at the center of this galaxy, which lies 3.8 billion light-years away from Earth. That same day, astronomers used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make a four-hour-long exposure of the puzzling source. The image, which locates the X-ray object 10 times more precisely than Swift, shows it lies at the center of the galaxy Hubble imaged.

"We have been eagerly awaiting the Hubble observation," said Neil Gehrels, the lead scientist for Swift at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "The fact that the explosion occurred in the center of a galaxy tells us it is most likely associated with a massive black hole. This solves a key question about the mysterious event."

Most galaxies, including our own, contain central black holes with millions of times the sun's mass; those in the largest galaxies can be a thousand times larger. The disrupted star probably succumbed to a black hole less massive than the Milky Way's, which has a mass four million times that of our sun.

Astronomers previously have detected stars disrupted by supermassive black holes, but none have shown the X-ray brightness and variability seen in GRB 110328A. The source has undergone numerous flares. Since Sunday, April 3, for example, it has brightened by more than five times.

Scientists think the X-rays may be coming from matter moving near the speed of light in a particle jet that forms along the rotation axis of the spinning black hole as the star's gas falls into a disk around the black hole.

"The best explanation at the moment is we happen to be looking down the barrel of this jet," said Andrew Levan at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, who led the Chandra observations. "When we look straight down these jets, a brightness boost lets us view details we might otherwise miss."

This brightness increase, which is called relativistic beaming, occurs when matter moving close to the speed of light is viewed nearly head on. Astronomers plan additional Hubble observations to see if the galaxy's core changes brightness.

Goddard manages Swift and Hubble. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages Chandra. Hubble was built and is operated in partnership with the European Space Agency. Science operations for all three missions include contributions from many national and international partners.

Francis Reddy
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, Md.


For more information and images associated with these observations, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/star-disintegration.html


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Miley Beiber

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BlogDogIt

I was witness to a shout-box exchange wherein several people where expressing their
disgust for the Justin Bieber and Hannah Montana phenomena.
This I post for their edification.

Original embedded video dead:

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Green Tunnel by Kevin Gallagher

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BlogDogIt

A six month journey along the 2,200 mile long Appalachian Trail, condensed and reinterpreted into five minutes of stop-motion.

    The Appalachian Trail is a rugged wilderness footpath stretching 2,200 miles from Georgia to Maine. Each year a few adventuresome individuals endeavor to hike its entire length in one long trek. For half a year these thru-hikers encounter all of the severity, grace and challenge to be found on the United States' most famed trail. Filmmaker Kevin Gallagher walked the length of this path and, in doing so, sought to capture the sometimes inchoate and transcendent experience of living in the natural world.


Click Read More To Continue . . .
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DIY scanning electron microscope - Overview video

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BlogDogIt

Reprinted from Ben Krasnow's Blog:

Today, I finally produced an image with my DIY scanning electron microscope. I've spent the last few months working on this project, and am encouraged by today's success. There is still a lot of work left to do in making the image higher resolution, and eliminating sources of noise, however this image proves that all parts of the microscope are operating as designed.

Source:http://benkrasnow.blogspot.com/

visit his site for updated information

Click On Read More for the Overview Video

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Wave of Distruction

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BlogDogIt

Satellite Photos of Japan, Before and After the Quake and Tsunami

Sendai

Click For Larger Image

gif animation by BlogDogIt
Click For Larger Image

Visit The New York Times for complete collection of interactive photos; featuring inovative slider action to control comparisons.

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WTF? in Arkansas

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BlogDogIt

Partly Cloudy, Chance Of Dead Birds (And Fish, Too)

(UPDATE: Blame Noise. Maybe)

by Perry Michael Simon on January 3, 2011

Nobody knows yet why somewhere upwards of a thousand � maybe as many as 2,000 � blackbirds fell out of the sky in Beebe, Arkansas just before New Year�s.

Theories? Maybe they were hit by lightning. Or caught in a storm. Or even startled by fireworks and stressed to death. Or something. All anyone knows is that dead birds suddenly begain to rain down on the town.

You got any ideas? Because nobody else has any. They�ll be doing some necropsy work this week to see if they can find out what killed the birds, but, at the moment, it�s a mystery.

And, please, save the Hitch*censored* references. Those birds attacked people. They didn�t drop dead and fall on people. That would have been a very different movie.

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